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Interview with Stuart Vener

16 Jun

Interview with Stuart Vener

Stuart Vener is a financial expert with an eclectic radio program that covers everything from mortgages to sex with dolphins.  Yes, I said sex with dolphins.  He’s a great host with a great sense of humor.  He loves potty humor, so he was willing to chat with us about our book and crap in general. Check out our interview with him as well as the rest of his show.  Our interview will air on June 17 at 10am EST on http://w4cy.com/, as well as on Thursday June 20 at 9am EST on local talk radio stations in Tampa, Florida: AM1340, AM1350 and AM 1400.  

World Water Day is March 22

4 Mar

 

 

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Thirsty?  Want a glass of water?  Go get one.  Easy, right?  Most of us can simply walk to the nearest tap and drink what comes out.  Over a BILLION people in the world can’t do that.  They have no access to clean drinking water—as a result, 4,500 children die EVERY DAY.

In 1993 the United Nations declared March 22 “World Water Day,” a day to bring awareness to the global water crisis.  This year’s theme is “Water, Water Everywhere, but Only if We Share.”   I thought I would just write a blog entry about how we all need to take shorter showers and follow the “if it’s yellow let it mellow; if it’s brown flush it down” philosophy.  But “Water Cooperation,” as the UN calls it, involves sharing water among communities in new ways and doing a serious reevaluation of how we manage existing resources.

As with most crises the world faces, the elephant in the room is population growth.  There are a lot of people on the planet and only a finite amount of resources.  So what can we do?  The UN isn’t merely asking Westerners to turn off the tap while brushing their teeth—that kind of behavior is helpful, but it’s literally only a drop in the bucket.

Most of us have become aware of the term “Carbon Footprint” in the past few years.  What is more surprising is the “Water Footprint” modern life impresses on the environment.  The majority of global water consumption isn’t from downing gallons of drinking water.  Agriculture is the main drain on the world’s water supply—farming accounts for over 90% of the world’s water consumption.  But we all need to eat.  In fact, most of our water intake actually comes from the foods we eat.  So how can we help mitigate water shortages and still feed the world?

“Sustainable” is the new buzzword in the world of all things “Green” these days, but there’s a good reason for that.  We can’t simply siphon off the world’s resources indefinitely and expect that this behavior will “sustain” life as we know it.  That’s insane.  The principles of “sustainability” are especially applicable to water consumption.  One of the best things you can do to save water is going to sound really weird.  It’s a little more radical than turning off the faucet when you brush.  Brace yourself.

Eat less meat.

Don’t freak out.  I didn’t say eat none.  Just less.  To produce one pound of beef it takes between 2,500 to 5,000 gallons of water.  To produce one pound of wheat it only takes 25 gallons.  Yep.  Grains and vegetables demand MUCH less water.

But take heart.  This behavior will not only lessen your individual impact on the environment and save water specifically, it will also help you personally.  Your overall health will improve.  Modern medicine backs this up—I’m not just some hippie telling you to hug a cow.  Google “Meat consumption and cancer” and see the scary stuff that pops up from reputable sources.  Yikes!

So eat less meat.  Your prostate and colon will thank you.  And you’ll lessen your “Water Footprint.”

Happy World Water Day!

For more information on World Water Day visit http://www.unwater.org/worldwaterday/

Are you now depressed about the world’s water crisis?  Need a laugh? Buy Flush This Book and not only will you laugh, but you’ll be donating to two great organizations that help improve sanitation and access to clean water world wide.  We will donate a portion of our proceeds to the World Toilet Organization and DefeatDD.

Guest Blog from Wendy Parker

15 Jul

“…I became certain I would drown in a Minnesota toilet.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ever have your posterior doused by an overly eager public toilet? Ever fear the EF5 vortex of those suckers will rip out your colon?  Guest blogger Wendy Parker understands.

Click on the link below and read Wendy’s hilarious rant on “Automatic Hell” in which she recounts the harrowing tale of a public loo with sinister sensor.

http://www.thegeorgeandwendyshow.com/91043352

World Water Day is March 22!

21 Mar

Image

Thirsty?  Want a glass of water?  Go get one.  Easy, right?  Most of us can simply walk to the nearest tap and drink what comes out.  Over a BILLION people in the world can’t do that.  They have no access to clean drinking water—as a result, 4,500 children die EVERY DAY.  

In 1993 the United Nations declared March 22 “World Water Day,” a day to bring awareness to the global water crisis.  This year’s theme is “The World is Thirsty Because We Are Hungry.”  I thought this was an odd theme before doing some research.  I thought I would just write a blog entry about how we all need to take shorter showers and follow the “if it’s yellow let it mellow; if it’s brown flush it down” philosophy. 

As with most crises the world faces, the elephant in the room is population growth.  There are a lot of people on the planet and only a finite amount of resources.  So what can we do?  This year the UN isn’t merely asking Westerners to turn off the tap while brushing their teeth—that kind of behavior is helpful, but it’s literally only a drop in the bucket. 

Most of us have become aware of the term “Carbon Footprint” in the past few years.  What is more surprising is the “Water Footprint” modern life impresses on the environment.  The majority of global water consumption isn’t from downing gallons of drinking water.  Agriculture is the main drain on the world’s water supply—farming accounts for over 90% of the world’s water consumption.  But we all need to eat.  In fact, most of our water intake actually comes from the foods we eat.  So how can we help mitigate water shortages and still feed the world? 

“Sustainable” is the new buzzword in the world of all things “Green” these days, but there’s a good reason for that.  We can’t simply siphon off the world’s resources indefinitely and expect that this behavior will “sustain” life as we know it.  That’s insane.  The principles of “sustainability” are especially applicable to water consumption.  One of the best things you can do to save water is going to sound really weird.  It’s a little more radical than turning off the faucet when you brush.  Brace yourself. 

Eat less meat.

Don’t freak out.  I didn’t say eat none.  Just less.  To produce one pound of beef it takes between 2,500 to 5,000 gallons of water.  To produce one pound of wheat it only takes 25 gallons.  Yep.  Grains and vegetables demand MUCH less water.

But take heart.  This behavior will not only lessen your individual impact on the environment and save water specifically, it will also help you personally.  Your overall health will improve.  Modern medicine backs this up—I’m not just some hippie telling you to hug a cow.  Google “Meat consumption and cancer” and see the scary stuff that pops up from reputable sources.  Yikes!

So eat less meat.  Your prostate and colon will thank you.  And you’ll lessen your “Water Footprint.” 

Happy World Water Day!

For more information on World Water Day visit http://www.unwater.org/worldwaterday/

Are you now depressed about the world’s water crisis?  Need a laugh? Buy Flush This Book and not only will you laugh, but you’ll be donating to two great organizations that help improve sanitation and access to clean water world wide.  We will donate a portion of our proceeds to the World Toilet Organization and DefeatDD.

Poopy Pinkie Update

5 Mar

A dog with infinite patience is a treasure.

Children are impressionable and are firm advocates of the Monkey-See-Monkey-Do philosophy of life.  As parents, we’re aware of these facts, but there are still moments when we’re taken by surprise. 

My little Phoebe has been my frequent sidekick on trips to the vet with our dog Gretzky.  The most recent one, however, had quite an impact on her curiosity and penchant for reenactment.  I was folding laundry last week in the master bedroom when my daughter walked in and handed me a small hairbrush she has had since infancy.

“Mommy, can you please wash this hairbrush?  It stinks.”

I sized up the manner in which she held the thing—pinching the portion that housed the bristles between her thumb and forefinger with one hand, pinching her nose shut with the other. 

“Why does it stink?” I asked. 

“Because it was in Gretzky’s butt.” 

Phoebe offered this explanation without fanfare, and without the laughter that would accompany such an outrageous statement if it were meant as a joke.  I eyed the hairbrush suspiciously.  The evidence I was hoping not to find was streaked on the otherwise white handle—only a smear of light brown, but enough to let inquiring minds know where it had been.  The dog came into view of the bedroom’s doorframe.  He looked okay, but he was sporting those “Help Me” eyes I have seen many times since my daughter’s birth four years ago.

“Why was the hairbrush in Gretzky’s butt?”  I asked, still a little fazed that I had occasion to utter the words.

“Because I was pretending to take his temperature like the vet did,” Phoebe answered in a tone that implied I should have known this already. 

“Phoebe, only the vet is allowed to take Gretzky’s temperature.  Do you understand?  I know you wanted to pretend you were helping Gretzky, but you are not allowed to put anything in the dog’s butt.  Nothing goes in Gretzky’s butt.  Nothing,” I still could not believe the necessity of the conversation.

Phoebe, looking visibly disappointed, turned on her heel and went to sulk in her room.

And I went to the bathroom with the hairbrush.  And some bleach.

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